When it comes to scenic views in Dorset we are truly spoilt for choice. To help you decide where to visit in the wonderful area near our campsite, we’ve narrowed it down to ten must-see views in the county. All of the wonders of geology in this shortlist will make for both dramatic photo opportunities as well as memorable experiences that you really must see for yourself.

Colmer’s Hill, Bridport

Despite its small size, Colmer’s Hill is perhaps the most iconic hill in Dorset. It is located on the outskirts of Bridport in the small village of Symondsbury and offers breath-taking views over the West Dorset countryside. On a clear day the views extend out to sea and in to neighbouring East Devon. As the sun goes down the tree lined summit creates a magnificent silhouette, which dominates the skyline and makes Colmer’s Hill a popular spot amongst local landscape photographers.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Kester Freeman (@kesfreeman) on

Maiden Castle, Dorchester

Maiden Castle is the largest hill fort in Great Britain and dates back to the Iron Ages. It was home to early settlers and features high mounds and ditches, which were built to defend against invasion. At the top there is evidence of roman inhabitants and information boards give an insight into the people that once called this interesting place home. The undulating grassland creates an impressive landscape and visitors can enjoy panoramic views over Dorset’s rolling hills, towards the town of Dorchester and beyond.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Richie Poor (@richies_incredible_britain) on

Portland Viewing Point, Portland

The Portland viewing point offers outstanding views across Portland Harbour, the Fleet Lagoon and along 18 miles of Chesil Beach. It is the ideal place to stop to admire the Dorset coastline and the perfect place to watch the sun dip below the horizon. On a blustery day you can hear the roar of the pebbles as the waves crash into the shoreline at Chesil Cove. The Olympic Rings sculpture commemorates the areas involvement in the 2012 Olympic games and creates the ideal backdrop for a family photo.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Chris Jones (@chrisjonesphotographer) on

Golden Cap

Golden Cap is the highest point on the South Coast of Great Britain, and provides an exceptional view of the Jurassic Coast and beyond. The coastal footpath from Seatown is well worth the 40-minute climb to the summit, where a stunning vista encompassing Portland to the east and as far west as Dartmoor awaits.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Karen Platt (@karen.6191) on

Durdle Door, Lulworth

Based near Lulworth, Durdle Door is one of the most iconic coastal rock formations in the UK. Formed naturally over time, the dramatic 200-foot high limestone arch makes for a spectacular view, with the Isle of Portland visible on the horizon. To experience the ultimate magic of Durdle Door is to witness the ‘through the keyhole’ shot of the sunrise/sunset peaking through the arch.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by André Alexander | Germany (@formgestalter) on

Clavell Tower, Kimmeridge

Clavell Tower was built in 1830 as an observatory and folly overlooking Kimmeridge Bay. It was moved inland in 2002 after coastal erosion had left the building desperately close to the cliff edge. The greatest views of the bay are obtained from the top of the four-story tower, with a magnificent panoramic view of the Jurassic Coast. Despite the exclusivity of the tower, the surrounding area has provided inspiration for literary greats and forms part of the South West Coastal Path.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Love For Dorset (@lovefordorset) on

Old Harry Rocks

The extraordinary views from Old Harry Rocks stretch as far East as Hengistbury Head across Bournemouth, Poole Harbour and Studland with the Isle of Wight visible on the horizon. Consisting of three chalk formations, Old Harry’s Rock refers to the single stack furthest out to sea. Handfast Point represents the furthest mainland viewing position which offers a unique sense of elevation over the water. Alternatively, the boat tours from Poole offer a scenic view from the sea looking inland.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Anju (@goldunseen_anju) on

Winspit

Winspit is a fascinating disused quarry on the cliffs near Worth Matravers. The site is steeped in history, as its stone that had been quarried in the many caves and tunnels had great value for building material. Some of the caves are now closed to the public and visitors are advised to stick to the coastal footpaths. Despite the restrictions and risk of rock fall, Winspit is popular with climbers and offers an atmospheric experience with impressive views.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by World 🌎 Feature 🌍 Page (@dreamworldimages) on

Church Ope Cove, Portland

At just 300 metres wide, Church Ope Cove, is a small beach that sits on the East side of the Isle of Portland, near Weymouth. It is often described as a hidden gem and a place of great tranquillity. Those who are prepared to take the steep steps that descend to the cove are rewarded with an opportunity to admire the stunning sea views. The church ruins and remains of nearby Rufus Castle, which overlooks the cove contribute to an otherworldly feel to the experience.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Richie Poor (@richies_incredible_britain) on

Gold Hill, Shaftsbury

The instantly recognisable view from the top of the steep cobbled street of Gold Hill in Shaftsbury is widely considered to be a national treasure. Made famous for the 1973 Hovis advert directed by Ridley Scott. The picturesque scene is framed by the ancient walls of Shaftsbury Abby and complemented by a beautiful sweeping view of the Dorset countryside, making it perhaps the most romantic scene on this list.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Ramona (@monalogue) on